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Definition of like:

  1. A liking; a preference; inclination; - usually in pl.; as, we all have likes and dislikes.
  2. Equal, or nearly equal; as, fields of like extent.
  3. Having probability; affording probability; probable; likely.
  4. Having the same, or nearly the same, appearance, qualities, or characteristics; resembling; similar to; similar; alike; -- often with in and the particulars of the resemblance; as, they are like each other in features, complexion, and many traits of character.
  5. In a like or similar manner.
  6. In a manner like that of; in a manner similar to; as, do not act like him.
  7. Inclined toward; disposed to; as, to feel like taking a walk.
  8. Likely; probably.
  9. That which is equal or similar to another; the counterpart; an exact resemblance; a copy.
  10. The stroke which equalizes the number of strokes played by the opposing player or side; as, to play the like.
  11. To be pleased with in a moderate degree; to approve; to take satisfaction in; to enjoy.
  12. To be pleased; to choose.
  13. To come near; to avoid with difficulty; to escape narrowly; as, he liked to have been too late. Cf. Had like, under Like, a.
  14. To have an appearance or expression; to look; to seem to be ( in a specified condition).
  15. To liken; to compare.
  16. To suit; to please; to be agreeable to.

Synonyms:

wish well, give care, standardized, worry, the like, savor, wish, exchangeable, please, go for, the likes of, want, conceit, similar, similarity, handle, equal, take to, will, bid, interchangeable, alike, match, look-alike, equivalent, parallelism, resemblance, ilk, comparable, manage, kindred, care, dig, suchlike, corresponding, deal, peer, like-minded, standardised.

Usage examples:

  • Do so; I shall like it.

    - "The Memoires of Casanova, Complete The Rare Unabridged London Edition Of 1894, plus An Unpublished Chapter of History, By Arthur Symons", Jacques Casanova de Seingalt.
  • Something like that, you know.

    - "The Red Planet", William J. Locke.
  • They do like you.

    - "Prudence of the Parsonage", Ethel Hueston.